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Health Care Provision & Financing

Submitted by jrreid on Mon, 2020-01-28 11:18.

Few issues of public policy are of greater concern and more likely to spark heated debate than those with respect to health care.  Any proposal for reforming health care delivery and finance quickly becomes a contentious point of debate.  Proponents of reform typically argue that changes are required to ensure the financial sustainability of Alberta's public health care system, to improve access, and to improve the quality of health care.  Defenders of the status quo argue that any substantial reform or change in the current system will restrict access to health care and so violate a so-called "Canadian value."

The consequence of such highly polarized and ideologically-based confrontations is that it stifles open and useful debates over what kind of health care system Canadians want and over what potential reforms for improving the system may exist.  Politically-charged accusations have taken the place of honest presentations of facts and unbiased assessments of potential reforms.  In this atmosphere of distrust provincial governments in Canada have seemingly found more comfort in tinkering at the margins of the current system of health care provision and financing even in light of evidence - evidence most notable in the form of long wait times -- that this system is failing Canadians in some fundamental ways.

The goal of the Research Theme on Health Care Financing and Provision is to provide a forum for those interested in offering fresh and objective evaluations on issues to do with the appropriate design of a health care system that best balances considerations of equity and efficiency.  The research papers presented here are intended to provide an objective and evidence-based assessment of the potential for reforming the way health care is delivered and financed in Canada.  The research presented here will also be multi-disciplinary and so allow for a broader assessment of possible reforms than has often been made available by those who frequently offer opinions on these issues.  All research papers are peer reviewed by a minimum of two recognized experts in the field. 

Gerard Boychuk (2008) The Regulation of Private Health Funding and Insurance in Alberta Under the Canada Health Act: A Comparative Cross-Provincial Perspective.  SPS Research Paper: The Health Series, The School of Policy Studies, University of Calgary, Volume 1, Issue 1, December.

Aidan Hollis (2009) Generic Drug Pricing and Procurement: A Policy for Alberta.  SPS Research Paper: The Health Series, The School of Policy Studies, University of Calgary, Volume 2, Issue 1, February.

Livio Di Matteo and Rosanna Di Matteo (2009) The Fiscal Sustainability of Alberta's Public Health Care System.  SPS Research Paper: The Health Series, The School of Public Policy, University of Calgary, Volume 2, Issue2, March.  On line data appendix.

Michael Yeo, J.C. Herbert Emery and Daniel Kary (2009) The Private Insurance Debate in Canadian Health Policy: Making the Values Explicit.  SPP Research Paper: The Health Series, The School of Public Policy, University of Calgary, Volume 2, Issue 3, June.

Jane Ruseski (2009) Competition in Canadian Health Care Service Provision: Good, Bad or Indifferent?.  SPP Research Paper: The Health Series, The School of Public Policy, University of Calgary, Volume 2, Issue 4, November.

David Dranove, Cory Capps, and Leemore Dafny (2009) A Competitive Process for Procuring Health Services: A Review of Principles with an Application to Cataract Services.  SPP Research Paper: The Health Series, The School of Public Policy, University of Calgary, Volume 2, Issue 5, December.