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Institute for Advanced Policy Research  

The Institute for Advanced Policy Research (IAPR) is a public policy research institute created at the University of Calgary in the Fall of 2004. The IAPR’s mandate is to enhance the quality of public policy research generated at the University of Calgary; to disseminate that research to academics, the public, and policymakers; and to engage graduate students in policy relevant research. The emphasis of the Institute is to provide a solid, analytical, evidenced based foundation for public policy discourse by integrating scholarly knowledge with practical applications.

The Institute draws together existing public policy expertise from several departments and faculties across campus to provide a collaborative, integrated, cross-disciplinary approach to research in the public policy area. The intention is to build the intellectual critical mass necessary to produce pioneering public policy research and contribute to the development of public policy in Canada.


What’s New?

Party and Election Finance

March, 2006: IAPR Professor Lisa Young is hosting a conference on Party and Election Finance: Consequences for Democracy, at the Rozsa Center, University of Calgary, on May 25-26, 2006.  To view the conference program click here.

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Accommodating Disability in the Workplace

February, 2006: A conference on Accomodating Disability in the Workplace: Research, Policy and Practice, co-sponsored by the IAPR, the Industrial Relations Research Group at the University of Calgary, the Workers Compensation Board of Alberta, and the Faculty of Management at the University of Alberta, will be held on June 14, 2020 at the Westin Hotel in Calgary.  The conference chairs are IAPR Professor Daphne Taras and Kelly Williams of the University of Lethbridge.  For more information click here.

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Labour Arbitration and Policy Conference

February, 2006: IAPR Fellow Allen Ponak is chair of the Labour Arbitration and Policy Conference, to be held on June 14 and 15 at the Westin Hotel in Calgary.  To go to the conference web site click here.

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Alberta Requires Amendment to the Labour Code

January, 2006: IAPR Professor Daphne Taras argues in this IAPR Policy Brief that Alberta's Labour Code should be amended to allow for first contract arbitration.  Taras points out that the recent labour dispute at Lakeside Packers in Brooks, Alberta may not have reached the point that it did in most other provinces, where an arbitrator would have been appointed to help craft Lakeside's first collective agreement.  To see the policy brief click here

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Private Health Care in Alberta

January, 2006: A new IAPR Policy Brief by Herb Emery examines the role of private health insurance in Alberta.   To see the policy brief click here.  To see the technical paper click here To see a list of businesses we know: Super Steam - website, Green Collar Landscaping (website), Uptown Yonge Dental, Sedation Dentistry.

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Research In Action

December, 2005: The IAPR is featured at the University of Calgary's Research in Action (RIA) series at the Petroleum Club in Calgary on December 2.  The RIA series presents University of Calgary research to the broader Calgary communityr.  A copy of the information brochure available at the RIA presentation is available here.

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McGuinty's complaint should be Klein's too, paper argues

May, 2005:  IAPR just released  Policy Brief authored by Ronald D. Kneebone, University of Calgary.  "McGuinty's Complaint."  This policy brief analyzes fiscal imbalances between Ottawa and Ontario, and between Ottawa and Alberta.  "If Prime Minister Martin is now recognizing that the size of the imbalance faced by taxpayers in Ontario is too large, will he now be entering into negotiations with Premier Klein to address the exact same problem faced by taxpayers in Alberta?  "If not, the only conclusion . . . is that the Prime Minister's response to Premier McGuinty's complaint has little to do with firmly held principles or a sense of fairness, and has everything to do with political expediency,"  Kneebone writes, suggesting that "vote-rich" and "Liberal-friendly" Ontario is worth a $5.75 billion investment from Ottawa whereas Alberta is not.  Press release.

  

Democracy in Alberta ailing, policy paper warns

May, 2005:  IAPR has just released a Policy Brief authored by Harold Jansen, University of Lethbridge and Lisa Young, University of Calgary.  "Electoral Democracy in Alberta:  Time for Reform".  The paper calls for a "Citizens' Assembly" to study and potentially make recommendations for reforming the electoral process, which is the method used in Ontario and British Columbia.  "If you think that democracy matters, then how we elect our governments matters."  says Dr. Lisa Young.  "This is the one moment when we get some sort of say in who is going to govern us and if the system isn't working - if it doesn't reflect our real preferences - then there's something wrong."  Press release.

 

The Decline in AISH Benefits Since 1993

February, 2005:  The IAPR released a Policy Brief authored by Ron Kneebone, a professor in the Department of Economics and the IAPR.  "Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped:  The Decline in Financial Benefits Since 1993" details the decline in the purchasing power of the financial benefit paid to those in the provincial government's AISH program.  AISH is intended to provide income support to those whose physical or mental disabilities make it difficult for them to earn a living.  Kneebone considers alternative measures of what might constitute an appropriate increase in the financial benefit relative to what was paid in 1993.  He shows that while disagreement exists over how large should be the increase in the monthly benefit, it would be very difficult to justify as appropriate the $40 increase in the monthly AISH financial benefit the provincial government has awarded since 1993.  Press release.

 

Helliwell Visiting Killam Fellow with IAPR

January, 2005: Professor John Helliwell has won the Killam Fellowship for visiting professors at the University of Calgary.  Helliwell will be at the University of Calgary for the winter 2005 term, from mid-January to mid-April.  Prof. Helliwell is a distinguished economist from the University of British Columbia and was nominated for the fellowship by the IAPR.  While at the University of Calgary, Prof. Helliwell will work with graduate students and members of the IAPR on various aspects of subjective well being. Our website is made possible through sponsorships provided by businesses such as Cannect (debt consolidation Toronto)

 

Visions of Calgary's Future

December 20, 2020: IAPR Research Fellow Byron Miller discusses visions for Calgary's future in his Oped piece for the Calgary Herald.  "Cities are not pre-ordained", says Miller, "they are about choices and consequences."  In the Oped piece Prof. Miller discusses insights gleaned from the IAPR's speaker series on sustainable urban futures, which included public presentations by the University of Virginia's Tim Beatley, former B.C. premier Mike Harcourt, and former Winnipeg mayor Glenn Murray.  Visions of Calgary's Future.

 

Bolster Heritage Fund

November 1, 2020: Three University of Calgary economists call on the provincial government to revitalize the Heritage Savings and Trust Fund. The IAPR Policy Brief, entitled  "Living on Borrowed Time:  "Alberta at the Crossroads" is authored by Ron Kneebone, Ken McKenzie and Scott Taylor. “Alberta’s economy is dependent on non-renewable resources, so when times are good it is vitally important that the government have a plan for reinvesting surplus revenue,” the authors say, adding that “it is inappropriate for the province to tie spending to highly volatile royalty revenues; there are certain guiding principles that should be observed in managing public finances in a resource-based economy.” The authors also emphasize the importance of investing in higher education, stating that “higher education may not have brought Alberta to where it is today, but it is required to ensure that it maintains this path into tomorrow.”  Press Release.

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